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Business Insurance Links
Filing a Liability Claim 

No business can afford to be unprepared for a lawsuit.

Liability insurance protects your business assets when the business is sued for something the business did (or failed to do) that contributed to injury or property damage to someone else.

Liability coverage extends not only to paying damages but also to the attorneys’ fees and other costs involved in defending against the lawsuit, whether valid or not.

The standard business owners policy provides liability coverage, as does a separate policy known as a commercial general liability (CGL) insurance policy.

Generally, commercial liability insurance, whether purchased in a separate policy, or as part of a standard business owners policy, will cover bodily injury, property damage, personal injury or advertising injury. The medical expenses of a person (other than an employee) injured at the business or as a direct result of the operations of the business are also covered.

Usually excluded from both types of liability insurance policies are suits by customers against a business for nonperformance of a contract and by employees charging wrongful termination or racial or gender discrimination or harassment.

Business Group Plans

Types & Uses of Retirement Plans for Business/Group/Employees*

Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) Plan: For self-employed people and small business owners who wish to make tax-deductible contributions of up to $40,000 or 25% of their income, whichever is less, and that of their eligible employees.

Simple IRA Plan: For firms of 100 or fewer employees to establish an employee savings program for pre-tax contributions of up to $7,000 per year.

Profit Sharing Plan (Keogh** Plan): For business owners who wish to make tax-deductible contributions of up to 15% of each participant’s pay, and have vesting and loan schedules not available with a SEP.

Money Purchase Pension Plan (Keogh** Pension Plan): For business owners with predictable incomes who wish to make pre-determined tax-deductible contributions of up to 25% of each Participant’s pay.

Age-Weighted or Comparability Plan: For business owners who are older and more highly paid than most of their employees and wish to allocate contributions under a formula based on both age and salary.

Defined Benefit Pension Plan: For business owners who wish to contribute enough money each year to provide a specific benefit upon retirement. This may be beneficial to older employees with a high, stable income who need a rapid accumulation of assets over a short period of time.

401(k) Plan: For employers who wish to allow employees to make pre-tax contributions through payroll deductions of up to $11,000 per year or 25% of their pay, whichever is less.

Safe Harbor or DASH 401(k) Plan: For business owners who wish to give their employees the advantages of a 401(k) plan, while maximizing the amount they can put away for themselves.

403(b) Plan: For employees of public schools, non-profit hospitals and other certain tax-exempt organizations. Also known as a Tax-Sheltered Account.

Our agency does not provide legal or tax advice. For specific legal or tax advice based on your situation, please contact your attorney of tax advisor.

** The term “Keogh” or “HR-10” describes any type of retirement plan established by an unincorporated business – whether it be a profit sharing, money purchase or defined benefit plan.

 

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